CAUSES OF EARLY-ONSET DEMENTIA IN A TERTIARY REFERRAL CENTER IN ISTANBUL


Ozerden M., Behrem N., Topcular B., KIRBAŞ D. , Sakalli N. K.

6th International Conference on Alzheimers Disease and Related Disorders in the Middle East, İstanbul, Turkey, 25 - 27 October 2013, vol.35, no.3, pp.716

  • Publication Type: Conference Paper / Summary Text
  • Volume: 35
  • City: İstanbul
  • Country: Turkey
  • Page Numbers: pp.716

Abstract

Objectives

Early-onset dementia is defined as dementia before 65 years of age. The prevalence of dementia <65 years of age is approximately 54-260/100,000. Studies on early onset Alzheimer’s dementia (AD) show different clinical and sociodemographic features compared to late onset AD. We aimed to study the clinical and sociodemographic features of early onset AD patients in our department.

Methods

We included consecutive early onset AD patients admitted to our Behavioural Neurology and Dementia outpatient clinic between September 2011 and January 2012 in the study.

Results

There were 48 early onset AD patients. Female/male ratio was 0.92. Mean age at symptom onset was 53.32 (36-64) years, mean age at onset was 56.82 (41-66) years. Mean education duration was 4.96 years. Mean follow-up time was 2.84 years. Mean MMSE and CDR scores at first visit were 13.34 and 1.66 respectively. The first symptom was memory impairment in 79.16% (n=38) of patients followed by executive dysfunction(n=6), language impairment (n=2) and visuospatial dysfunction (n=2). The female/male ratio is lower than in the late onset AD cohort in our department. The duration of education and CDR at first visit were similar to late onset AD patients. The frequency of cognitive domains other than memory as initial presentation was higher in early-onset AD patients. The rate of decline in MMSE and CDR was slower in early onset AD patients.

Conclusions

The frequency of early onset AD is increasing. Studies show that early and late onset AD have different characteristics in terms of clinical features.