Sleep Quality and Factors Affecting Sleep in Individuals With an Intestinal Ostomy: A Descriptive Cross-Sectional Study br


TEMİZ Z., ÇAVDAR İ., ÖZBAŞ A., Altunsoy M., AKYÜZ N., KUTLU F. Y.

WOUND MANAGEMENT & PREVENTION, vol.68, no.5, pp.28-36, 2022 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 68 Issue: 5
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.25270/wmp.2022.5.2836
  • Journal Name: WOUND MANAGEMENT & PREVENTION
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.28-36
  • Keywords: colostomy, cross-sectional study, ileostomy, sleep disorder, sleep quality, OF-LIFE, GENDER-DIFFERENCES, CANCER, STOMA
  • Istanbul University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Multiple factors affect the sleep quality of individuals with intestinal stomas. PURPOSE: This study sought to determine sleep quality and factors affecting sleep in individuals with intestinal ostomies. METHODS: A descriptive cross-sec-tional design was used. This study followed 68 individuals with intestinal stomas at the stoma therapy unit of a university hos-pital. A form was used to gather information about patient demographic and stoma-related data (age, sex, work status, stoma duration, cause and type of stoma, stoma care provider, sleep status during the day, daily coffee consumption, and stoma-re-lated factors affecting sleep), and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used to score patient sleep patterns. Descriptive statistics, t-test, chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and logistic regression analysis were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS:The patients' mean age was 53.7 +/- 13.8 years; 51.5% were male, and 66.2% were married. Of the 68 patients, 41.2% had a diagnosis of rectal cancer, and 55.9% had ileostomies. Mean stoma duration was 24.1 +/- 5.8 months, and 57.4% of participants performed their own stoma care. On a scale of 0 to 21, the participants' mean sleep score was 9.08 +/- 5.03, and 66.2% of pa-tients were found to have poor sleep quality. High sleep quality was significantly positively associated with colostomy (odds ra-tio, 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-2.69; P = .006) and self-performed stoma care (odds ratio, 1.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.30; P = .036). CONCLUSION: The results of the current study can provide reference data for future studies and highlight the importance of assessing sleep quality in persons with intestinal stomas.