Pediatric Guillain-Barre syndrome: Indicators for a severe course


Varkal M. A. , Uzunhan T. A. , Aydinli N. , Ekici B. , Caliskan M., Ozmen M.

ANNALS OF INDIAN ACADEMY OF NEUROLOGY, cilt.18, ss.24-28, 2015 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 18 Konu: 1
  • Basım Tarihi: 2015
  • Doi Numarası: 10.4103/0972-2327.144274
  • Dergi Adı: ANNALS OF INDIAN ACADEMY OF NEUROLOGY
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.24-28

Özet

Objectives: This study aims to retrospectively evaluate pediatric Guillain-Barre syndrome cases in a tertiary center in Istanbul, Turkey. Materials and Methods: The data of 40 patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome who had been admitted to the Department of Pediatrics at the Istanbul University Medical Faculty between 2005 and 2011 were collected. Mann-Whitney U, Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square, and Fisher's exact tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: Mean patient age was 5.4 +/- 3.0 years; 20 out of 40 patients (50%) were female and 20 (50%) were male. Preceding infection was detected in 32 cases (80%). Six patients had speech impairment. Out of eight patients with respiratory distress (20%), five required respiratory support (12.5%) of which three of them had speech impairment as well. According to nerve conduction studies, 21 patients (52.5%) had acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, 14 (35%) had acute motor axonal neuropathy, and five (12.5%) had acute motor-sensory axonal neuropathy. Thirty-three patients (82.5%) received intravenous immunglobulin, 3 (7.5%) underwent plasmapheresis and 4 (10%) received both. Time until recovery (P = 0.022) and time until aided (P = 0.036) and unaided (P = 0.027) walking were longer in patients with acute gastrointestinal infection than in those with upper respiratory tract infection (P < 0.05). Time until response to treatment (P = 0.001), time until aided (P = 0.001) and unaided (P = 0.002) walking, and time until complete recovery (P = 0.002) were longer in acute motor axonal neuropathy cases as compared to acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy cases. Conclusion: Recovery was longer with acute gastrointestinal infection and acute motor axonal neuropathy. Speech impairment could be a clinical clue for the need of mechanical ventilation.