Conversion to Sirolimus in Renal Transplant Recipients: A Single-Center Experience


Yelken B., Caliskan Y., Ozkan O., Gorgulu N., Yazici H. , Turkmen A., ...Daha Fazla

ARTIFICIAL ORGANS, cilt.34, 2010 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

Özet

Maintenance immunosuppression with calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) following renal transplantation is associated with nephrotoxicity and accelerated graft loss. Sirolimus (SRL) is a nonnephrotoxic immunosuppressive agent. We retrospectively analyzed our experience with kidney transplant recipients who were converted from CNI to SRL. A total of 58 renal transplant recipients were converted from CNI to SRL. SRL was started at a dose of 0.075 mg/kg and, at the same time, CNI dose was reduced by 50% daily for 3 days. SRL trough levels were targeted between 8 and 12 ng/mL. When target trough levels were achieved. CNI was withdrawn. The main indications for switching were posttransplant malignancies (n = 32) and chronic allograft. nephropathy (CAN) (n = 10). The mean time from transplantation to conversion was 84 +/- 71 months. Mean serum creatinine level was 1.63 +/- 0.52 mg/dL before conversion. Serum creatinine levels at the 1, 3, 6 months, and 1, 2, 3 years after conversion were 1.64 +/- 0.58 mg/dL (P = 0.67), 1.52 +/- 0.53 mg/dL (P = 0.414), 1.62 +/- 0.62 mg/dL (P = 0.734), and 1.48 +/- 0.58 mg/dL (P = 0.065), 1.58 +/- 0.53 mg/dL (P = 0.854), 1.88 +/- 0.77 mg/dL (P = 0.083), respectively. Daily proteinuria levels increased from 0.04 +/- 0.11 g/day at baseline to 0.55 +/- 1.33 g/day (P = 0.037) after conversion, in the responders group. In the nonresponders group, baseline proteinuria was 0.13 +/- 0.25 g/day, and increased to 1.44 +/- 2.44 g/day after conversion (P = 0.008). SRL was discontinued in 16 patients (31%) because of the occurrence of severe side effects. The proportion of patients remaining on SRL therapy over time was 43.1% at 1 year, 15.5% at 2 years after conversion, and 10.3% at 3 years after conversion. SRL conversion may be very useful in patients suffering from neoplasia; however, frequent side effects related with this intervention should be considered, and routine conversion from CNI to SRL to reduce nephrotoxicity should be discouraged.