Depth profiles of protein-bound microcystin in Kucukcekmece Lagoon


Koeker L., Akcaalan R., Dittmann E., Albay M.

TOXICON, vol.198, pp.156-163, 2021 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 198
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.toxicon.2021.05.005
  • Journal Name: TOXICON
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, Aerospace Database, Aquatic Science & Fisheries Abstracts (ASFA), BIOSIS, CAB Abstracts, Chemical Abstracts Core, Communication Abstracts, EMBASE, Environment Index, MEDLINE, Metadex, Pollution Abstracts, Veterinary Science Database, Civil Engineering Abstracts
  • Page Numbers: pp.156-163
  • Keywords: Microcystis, Microcystin, Protein-bound microcystin, Mcy gene, Kucukcekmece Lagoon, CYLINDROSPERMOPSIN PRODUCTION, ENVIRONMENTAL-FACTORS, TOXIC CYANOBACTERIA, OXIDATIVE STRESS, LIGHT LIMITATION, SWAN RIVER, AERUGINOSA, BLOOMS, PHYTOPLANKTON, DYNAMICS
  • Istanbul University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Microcystis is the most commonly found toxic cyanobacterial genus around the world and has a negative impact on the ecosystem. As a predominant producer of the potent hepatotoxin microcystin (MC), the genus causes outbreaks in freshwaters worldwide. Standard analytical methods that are used for the detection of microcystin variants can only measure the free form of microcystin in cells. Since microcystin was found as free and proteinbound forms in the cells, a significant proportion of microcystin is underestimated with analytical methods. The aim of the study was to measure protein-bound microcystins and determine the environmental factors that affect the binding of microcystin to proteins. Samples were taken at depths of surface, 1 m, 5 m, 10 m, 15 m, and 18 m in Kucukcekmece Lagoon to analyze depth profiles of two different microcystin forms from June to September 2012 at regular monthly intervals. Our findings suggest that the most important parameter affecting proteinbound microcystin at surface water is high light. Due to favorable environmental conditions such as temperature, light, and physicochemical parameters, the higher microcystin contents, both free and protein-bound MCs, were found in summer periods.