An investigation of effect of microwave energy on electrostatic separation of colemanite and ulexite


Eskibalci M. F. , Ozkan S. G.

MINERALS ENGINEERING, cilt.31, ss.90-97, 2012 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Yayın Türü: Makale / Tam Makale
  • Cilt numarası: 31
  • Basım Tarihi: 2012
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1016/j.mineng.2012.01.018
  • Dergi Adı: MINERALS ENGINEERING
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.90-97

Özet

In this study, an effect of microwave treatment on electrostatic separation of boron minerals namely colemanite and ulexite, obtained from Eti Mines Inc.'s Bigadic Mines in Turkey, was studied in order to determine the changes of electrostatic properties. The X-ray diffraction analyses for the samples showed that colemanite structure was not affected by microwave heat treatment till 900 W power level; however ulexite structure was decomposed after 360 W power level. In addition, TG/DTA results showed that colemanite started to lose its crystal water content at 370.1 (260-427)degrees C, whereas ulexite lost its crystal water content at 621.9 (60-855) degrees C. The SEM pictures for the samples also confirmed that microwave treatment affects considerably the particle surfaces in a certain level. The electrostatic separation tests for pure colemanite and ulexite minerals of 1 x 0.5 mm size range at the 10 kV, 18 kV, 20 kV, and 22 kV applied voltages without heating and with heating at 65 degrees C showed that the colemanite mineral particles behaved as non-conductive up to 18 kV at room temperature and it kept its non-conductivity after heating it at 65 degrees C and 22 kV. On the other hand, ulexite minerals behaved as conducting at low voltage and room temperature, but it became non-conductive after heating at 65 degrees C by increasing voltages. These results clearly indicate that separation of these two hydrated borates from each other might be possible for recovery of boron minerals in the industry due to electrostatic properties difference of colemanite and ulexite by heat treatment. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.