Comparison of two surgical techniques in Chiari Malformation Type 1 Patients: Duraplasty alone vs duraplasty with arachnoid dissection


ÖZLEN F., KÜÇÜKYÜRÜK B., ALIZADA O., Guler H., Akgun M. Y., KAFADAR A. M., ...More

CLINICAL NEUROLOGY AND NEUROSURGERY, vol.206, 2021 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 206
  • Publication Date: 2021
  • Doi Number: 10.1016/j.clineuro.2021.106686
  • Journal Name: CLINICAL NEUROLOGY AND NEUROSURGERY
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, Academic Search Premier, CAB Abstracts, EMBASE, MEDLINE
  • Keywords: Cerebellar herniation, Chiari malformation, Duraplasty, Foramen magnum, Syringomyelia, POSTERIOR-FOSSA DECOMPRESSION, I MALFORMATION, CEREBELLAR TONSILS, PERSISTENT SYRINGOMYELIA, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, METAANALYSIS
  • Istanbul University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Object: Optimal surgical technique to restore the cerebrospinal fluid flow through the foramen magnum remains to be debated in Chiari malformation type 1 (CM-1) patients.& nbsp; Method: This study included 46 patients with CM-1 who underwent surgical treatment by one of two methods: posterior fossa bone decompression (BD) with arachnoid preserving duraplasty (Group 1) and BD with duraplasty and arachnoid dissection (Group 2). Complaints of the patient population and neurological findings were assessed with Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Europe Quality of Life 5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) in pre- and postoperative periods . Results: NDI and EQ-5D scores improved in overall patient population and in each individual surgical group. Both groups showed a significant decrease in size of syringomyelia cavity. Complications resulting in recurrent treatments and re-operations occurred in 15% of patients (n = 7); six of them were from Group 2.& nbsp; Conclusion: CM-1 patients benefit significantly from surgical treatment. Duraplasty should be included to surgical technique. Avoiding arachnoid dissection may lead to better results regarding complication rates.