Differences In Anatomy Terminology Between Anatomy Textbooks And Clinical Resources: A Preliminary Study


Sağlam L., Coşkun Ö., Yiğit M., Gürses İ. A.

21. Ulusal Anatomi Kongresi, Ankara, Turkey, 28 - 29 November 2020, vol.13, pp.53

  • Publication Type: Conference Paper / Summary Text
  • Volume: 13
  • Doi Number: 10.2399/ana.20.001s
  • City: Ankara
  • Country: Turkey
  • Page Numbers: pp.53
  • Istanbul University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Objective: In line with the clinical need, the anatomical structures defined in clinical books can be more detailed and different compared to the anatomical structures defined in Terminologia Anatomica (TA). In this study, comparison of the anatomical knowledge and terminology between clinical and anatomical resources was aimed with a limited example to evaluate the current situation. Methods: To limit the study, a major joint and its ligaments were selected from the lower extremity. Accordingly, a list of ligaments under the title Ankle Joint of the TA published in 2011 was prepared. Seven basic anatomy resources (2 textbooks, 3 atlases and 2 cadaver atlases) and 3 orthopedic textbooks on arthroscopy and endoscopy of the ankle published after 2011 was compared. Results: Ten terms describing the ankle ligaments in TA (including the title) were observed. The coverage ratio of selected sources on the 10 identified terms were 10/10 (100%) for Clinically Oriented Anatomy, 10/10 (100%) for Gray’s Anatomy, 9/10 (90%) for Sobotta Atlas of Human Anatomy, 9/10 (90%) for Thieme Atlas of Anatomy, 8/10 (80%) for Anatomy a Photographic Atlas, and 6/10 (60%) for Human Anatomy Color Atlas and Textbook. The coverage of clinical sources were 8/10 (80%) for Ankle Arthroscopy Techniques Developed by the Amsterdam Foot and Ankle School, 10/10 (100%) for Ankle Joint Arthroscopy A Step-by-Step Guide, and 8/10 (80%) for Arthroscopy and Endoscopy of the Foot and Ankle Principle and Practice. Gray’s Anatomy, Ankle Joint Arthroscopy A Step-by-Step Guide, Ankle Arthroscopy Techniques Developed by the Amsterdam Foot and Ankle School, and Arthroscopy and Endoscopy of the Foot and Ankle Principle and Practice named additional 3, 3, 2, and 1 structures, respectively. Of these additional 10 terms, 7 were subcomponents of the medial collateral ligament and 3 were the subcomponents of the lateral collateral ligament. Conclusion: It was expected to see a more detailed terminology in orthopedic resources and Gray’s Anatomy, since they provide literature-based information and focus on postgraduate education. However, if it is considered that TA is a valid guide for all disciplines, it can be suggested that the new nomenclature in these textbooks should be evaluated and possibly included in the scope of the TA. Additionally, studies to detect the prevalence of similar inconsistencies in terms regarding different topographic regions or systems may be planned.

Keywords: terminologia anatomica, terminology, nomenclature, atlas, textbook