RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF 111 PATIENTS WITH HERPETIC ANTERIOR UVEITIS


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Öztük B., Altınkurt E. , Tutkun N. İ.

9th International Ocular Inflammation Society (IOIS) Congress, Paris, Fransa, 17 - 20 Eylül 2007, ss.80

  • Basıldığı Şehir: Paris
  • Basıldığı Ülke: Fransa
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.80

Özet

RF1-4

RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF 111 PATIENTS WITH HERPETIC

ANTERIOR UVEITIS

Otuk Berna M. (Istanbul University Istanbul Faculty of Medicine,

Ophthalmology Department) Altinkurt Emre (Istanbul University

Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Ophthalmology Department), Tugal-

Tutkun Ilknur (Istanbul University Istanbul Faculty of Medicine,

Ophthalmology Department)

Introduction and objectives: To describe the clinical features and

outcomes in patients with herpetic anterior uveitis

Methods: A retrospective study of 111 patients with herpetic anterior

uveitis diagnosed cl inically at the Dep artment of

Ophthalmology, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, from January 1996

to December 2006. When present, herpetic corneal disease and

active or past episode of herpes zoster ophthalmicus were considered

diagnostic of herpetic anterior uveitis. In patients without

corneal involvement, the diagnosis was based on the presence of at

least three of the following features: recurrent unilateral attacks in

the same eye, granulomatous keratic precipitates, patchy or sectoral

iris atrophy and/or transillumination defects, distorted pupil, and

acute elevation of intraocular pre s s u re during infl a m m at o ry

episodes.

Results: Fifty patients were male, 61 were female. Mean age at

onset of uveitis was 39.2 (5-74) years. Three atopic patients had

bilateral involvement. Twelve patients had active or a past episode

of herpes zoster ophthalmicus. Ocular findings were granulamatous

anterior uveitis (96.3%), active keratitis or corneal scars (57%), elevated

intraocular pressure (50.8%), iris atrophy and/or translummination

defect (48.2%), distorted pupil (25.4%), and posterior

synechiae (26.3%). The recurrence rate was 0.45 / person year. In

49 eyes (43%) there was no corneal scar or active keratitis during

follow-up period. Topical corticosteroid and oral antiviral therapy

were administered to all patients during active episodes. Oral corticosteroid

therapy was administered to 21.6% of the patients. Final

visual acuity was worse than 0.5 in 16.6% of the involved eyes and

was due to corneal scarring and cataract formation. The patients

with only iridocyclitis had no permanent visual loss. No patient had

any posterior pole complication. Two patients had secondary glaucoma.

Conclusions: Herpetic anterior uveitis is a distinct entity that can

be diagnosed clinically. Although the recurrence rate is high, visual

outcome is favorable in most cases.

Financial fundings: (None.)