Effects of fathers' attendance to labor and delivery on the experience of childbirth in Turkey


Gungor I. , Beji N. K.

WESTERN JOURNAL OF NURSING RESEARCH, cilt.29, ss.213-231, 2007 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 29 Konu: 2
  • Basım Tarihi: 2007
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1177/0193945906292538
  • Dergi Adı: WESTERN JOURNAL OF NURSING RESEARCH
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.213-231

Özet

This study was planned to experimentally determine the effects of fathers' attendance to labor and delivery on the experience of childbirth. Fifty primigravidae low-risk women and their partners were recruited to the study. The first 25 women were included in the experimental group, and their partners were allowed to participate in birth. The remaining 25 women were included in the control group, and their partners were not allowed to participate in birth. Perception of Birth Scale and Father Interview Form were used to evaluate couples' experiences during labor and delivery. In conclusion, fathers' support in birth helped mothers to have more positive experiences in all aspects of childbirth. There was no relationship between fathers' support and length of labor, use of pain-relieving drugs, or obstetric interventions in birth. When mother and father were supported during labor and delivery, the rate of the fathers who adopted an active role was high.

This study was planned to experimentally determine the effects of fathers' attendance to labor and delivery on the experience of childbirth. Fifty primigravidae low-risk women and their partners were recruited to the study. The first 25 women were included in the experimental group, and their partners were allowed to participate in birth. The remaining 25 women were included in the control group, and their partners were not allowed to participate in birth. Perception of Birth Scale and Father Interview Form were used to evaluate couples' experiences during labor and delivery. In conclusion, fathers' support in birth helped mothers to have more positive experiences in all aspects of childbirth. There was no relationship between fathers' support and length of labor, use of pain-relieving drugs, or obstetric interventions in birth. When mother and father were supported during labor and delivery, the rate of the fathers who adopted an active role was high.