Long term effects of thinning on soil and forest floor in a sessile oak (Quercus petrea (Matlusch) Lieb.) forest in Turkey


Makineci E.

JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY, vol.26, no.2, pp.257-263, 2005 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 26 Issue: 2
  • Publication Date: 2005
  • Journal Name: JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded, Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.257-263

Abstract

The effects of thinning on mineral soil and forest floor for three different thinning intensities (control, moderate and heavy) were studied in a Sessile oak forest 8 years after treatment. To examine responses to thinning, mass, organic matter and total nitrogen content in forest floor, bulk density and fine soil weight, total nitrogen, organic carbon concentrations and pH in upper mineral soil horizons were measured, and the results compared to control plot. The thinned plots have shown higher total nitrogen concentration and organic carbon in soil. Total mass, weight of layers of forest floor have shown significant patterns with thinning intensity. The present results indicate that various intensities of thinning for a sessile oak stand had major influence on soil and forest floor in eight years following treatment

The effects of thinning on mineral soil and forest floor for three different thinning intensities (control, moderate and heavy) were studied in a sessile oak forest 8 years after treatment. To examine responses to thinning, mass, organic matter and total nitrogen content in forest floor, bulk density and fine soil weight, total nitrogen, organic carbon concentrations and pH in upper mineral soil horizons were measured, and the results compared to control plot The thinned plots have shown higher total nitrogen concentration and organic carbon in soil. Total mass, weight of layers of forest floor have shown significant patterns with thinning intensity. The present results indicate that various intensities of thinning for a sessile oak stand had major influence on soil and forest floor In eight years following treatment.