Comparison of broiler live performance, carcass characteristics, and fatty acid composition of thigh meat when fed diets supplemented with neutralized sunflower soapstock or soybean oil


Pekel A. Y. , Demirel G., Midilli M., Ogretmen T., Kocabagli N., Alp M.

JOURNAL OF APPLIED POULTRY RESEARCH, vol.22, no.1, pp.118-131, 2013 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 22 Issue: 1
  • Publication Date: 2013
  • Doi Number: 10.3382/japr.2012-00656
  • Journal Name: JOURNAL OF APPLIED POULTRY RESEARCH
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus
  • Page Numbers: pp.118-131
  • Istanbul University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Two experiments were conducted to determine the influence of adding neutralized sunflower soapstock (NSS) or soybean oil (SO) to the broiler diet. In experiment 1, one hundred five 15-d-old Ross 308 broiler chickens were used to evaluate the AME(n) of NSS by the difference method. In experiment 2, a completely randomized design was used to evaluate the effects of fat source and level on broiler live performance, carcass characteristics, and fatty acid composition of thigh meat. A 2 x 3 factorial arrangement with 2 types of fat (NSS and SO) at 3 levels of inclusion (2, 4, and 6%) was used with 5 replicates per treatment using total of 750 birds. The average AME(n) of the NSS was determined as 8,530 kcal/kg. Performance of birds was unaffected by the dietary fat sources. Increasing the fat level from 2 to 6% improved the overall BW gain (P < 0.0001) and FCR (P < 0.001) of broilers, whereas feed intake was unaffected by different fat levels. Hot carcass yield and rib cage weight were higher for SO-fed birds than NSS-fed birds (P < 0.05). Wings and rib cage weights were higher in birds fed the 6% fat diet (P < 0.05). Leg quarter yield decreased with increased levels of fat inclusion (P < 0.01), whereas breast yield increased (P < 0.05). Dietary fat type modified fatty acids of thigh meat, resulting in significantly higher content of C14:0, C16:0, C16: 1, C18:1, sum of saturated fatty acids, and sum of monounsaturated fatty acids in birds fed NSS diets, whereas C18: 2, C18: 3, C20:0, and sum of polyunsaturated fatty acid contents decreased with NSS inclusion (P < 0.05). Saturated fatty acids and monounsaturated fatty acids significantly decreased and polyunsaturated fatty acids increased when dietary fat level increased (P < 0.0001). In conclusion, NSS can be included in broiler diets without any major differences in live performance by modifying the fatty acid profile of meat.