Genetic characterization of wild common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) from Turkey


Memis D. , Kohlmann K.

AQUACULTURE, cilt.258, ss.257-262, 2006 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

Özet

Wild common carp from three lakes in Turkey were genetically characterized by examining the variability of four microsatellite loci and the restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) of the mitochondrial ND-314 and ND-516 gene regions. Microsatellite variability did not differ significantly among the three populations and was only slightly lower than that of other wild-caught populations but remarkably higher than that of domesticated/captive stocks found in preceding studies. On the other hand, genetic differentiation between Turkish wild carp was significant and high (FST values ranged from 0.21 to 0.27). PCR-RFLP analysis revealed a total of five composite haplotypes. One of them was the typical European/Central Asian haplotype HI shared by two of the Turkish populations from Sapanca and Iznik Lakes, respectively. The remaining four haplotypes were very similar to HI differing in fragment patterns of only one or two restriction enzymes. Thus, present data further support the hypothesis of a single origin of present day European domesticated and wild/feral carp from a common ancestor with Central Asian carp. Considering that wild common carp are extremely endangered or already extinct in many areas of their natural distribution range, the examined Turkish populations represent valuable genetic resources of European carp that should be protected. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Wild common carp from three lakes in Turkey were genetically characterized by examining the variability of four microsatellite loci and the restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) of the mitochondrial ND-3/4 and ND-5/6 gene regions. Microsatellite variability did not differ significantly among the three populations and was only slightly lower than that of other wild-caught populations but remarkably higher than that of domesticated/captive stocks found in preceding studies. On the other hand, genetic differentiation between Turkish wild carp was significant and high (FST values ranged from 0.21 to 0.27). PCR-RFLP analysis revealed a total of five composite haplotypes. One of them was the typical European/Central Asian haplotype H1 shared by two of the Turkish populations from Sapanca and Iznik Lakes, respectively. The remaining four haplotypes were very similar to H1 differing in fragment patterns of only one or two restriction enzymes. Thus, present data further support the hypothesis of a single origin of present day European domesticated and wild/feral carp from a common ancestor with Central Asian carp. Considering that wild common carp are extremely endangered or already extinct in many areas of their natural distribution range, the examined Turkish populations represent valuable genetic resources of European carp that should be protected.