Use of intravenous immunoglobulin in pediatric practice


Zulfikar B., Koc B.

TURK PEDIATRI ARSIVI-TURKISH ARCHIVES OF PEDIATRICS, vol.49, no.4, pp.282-288, 2014 (ESCI) identifier identifier identifier

Abstract

In recent years, human-driven intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) administered intravenously have been widely used in treatment of many diseases. Intravenous immunoglobulin is obtained from human-driven plasma pools as in other plasma-driven products and IVIG preperations contain structurally and functionally intact immunoglobulin. Intravenous immunoglobulin was approved by FDA (Food and Drug Administration) in USA in 1981 for the first time and was started to be primarily used in patients with immune deficiency with hypogammaglobulinemia. The effects of intravenous immunoglobulin include complex mechanisms, but it exerts its essential action by eliminating the non-specific Fc receptors found in the mononuclear phagocytic system or by inhibiting binding of immune complexes to Fc receptors in the cells. Their areas of usage include conditions where their anti-inflammatory and immunomudulator effects are utilized in addition to replacement of deficient immunoglobulin. Although the definite indications are limited, it has been shown that it is useful in many diseases in clinical practice. Its side effects include fever, sweating, nausea, tachycardia, eczematous reactions, aseptic meningitis, renal failure and hematological-thromboembolic events. In this article, use of IVIG, its mechanisms of action, indications and side effects were discussed.