SHADE MATCHING PERFORMANCE OF NORMAL AND COLOR VISION-DEFICIENT DENTAL PROFESSIONALS WITH STANDARD DAYLIGHT AND TUNGSTEN ILLUMINANTS


Gökçe H. S. , Pişkin B., Ceyhan D., Gokce S. M. , Arisan V.

JOURNAL OF PROSTHETIC DENTISTRY, cilt.103, sa.3, ss.139-147, 2010 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Yayın Türü: Makale / Tam Makale
  • Cilt numarası: 103 Konu: 3
  • Basım Tarihi: 2010
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1016/s0022-3913(10)60020-0
  • Dergi Adı: JOURNAL OF PROSTHETIC DENTISTRY
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.139-147

Özet

Statement of problem. The lighting conditions of the environment and visual deficiencies such as red-green color vision deficiency affect the clinical shade matching performance of dental professionals.

 

The lighting conditions of the environment and visual deficiencies such as red-green color vision deficiency affect the clinical shade matching performance of dental professionals.

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shade matching performance of normal and color vision-deficient dental professionals with standard daylight and tungsten illuminants.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Two sets of porcelain disc replicas of 16 shade guide tabs (VITA Lumin) were manufactured to exact L*a*b* values by using a colorimeter. Then these twin porcelain discs (13 mm x 2.4 mm) were mixed up and placed into a color-matching cabinet that standardized the lighting conditions for the observation tests. Normal and red-green color vision-deficient dental professionals were asked to match the 32 porcelain discs using standard artificial daylight D65 (high color temperature) and tungsten filament lamp light (T) (low color temperature) illuminants. The results were analyzed by repeated-measures ANOVA and paired and independent samples t tests for the differences between dental professionals and differences between the illuminants (alpha=.05).

RESULTS:

Regarding the sum of the correct shade match scores of all observations with both illuminants, the difference between normal vision and red-green color vision-deficient dental professional groups was not statistically significant (F=4.132; P=.054). However, the correct shade match scores of each group were significantly different for each illuminant (P<.005). The correct shade matching scores of normal color vision dental professionals were significantly higher with D65 illuminant (t=7.004; P<.001). Color matching scores of red-green color vision-deficient dental professionals (approximately 5.7 more pairs than with D65) were significantly higher with T illuminant (t=5.977; P<.001). CONCLUSIONS.: Within the limitations of this study, the shade matching performance of dental professionals was affected by color vision deficiency and the color temperature of the illuminant. The color vision-deficient group was notably unsuccessful with the D65 illuminant in shade matching. In contrast, there was a significant increase in the shade matching performance of the color vision-deficient group with T illuminant. The lower color temperature illuminant dramatically decreased the normal color vision groups' correct shade matching score.