Do asymptomatic foreign bodies in the maxillary sinus always need to be removed?


Selvi F. , Enoz M. , Yazgin I., Cakarer S. , Keskin C.

B-ENT, vol.4, no.4, pp.243-247, 2008 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 4 Issue: 4
  • Publication Date: 2008
  • Title of Journal : B-ENT
  • Page Numbers: pp.243-247

Abstract

Do asymptomatic foreign bodies in the maxillary sinus always need to be removed? Foreign bodies may be displaced into the maxillary sinus as a result of trauma or during dental interventions. They commonly cause chronic sinusitis and/or fungal infections. This paper presents the case of a foreign body lodged in the right maxillary sinus ostium of a 31-year-old female patient. The foreign body was observed incidentally during radiological examination. After careful clinical and radiological examination, it was concluded that the foreign body was a piece of amalgam displaced into the maxillary sinus during a traumatic extraction. It is an uncommon finding to observe an asymptomatic dental foreign body in a position so close to the natural ostium of the maxillary sinus for so many years without any oro-antral fistula formation and/or sinusitis attacks. We describe the non-surgical approach to the case and the need for surgical management will be questioned. The importance of consultation between otolaryngologists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons will also be emphasised.

Do asymptomatic foreign bodies in the maxillary sinus always need to be removed? Foreign bodies may be displaced into the maxillary sinus as a result of trauma or during dental interventions. They commonly cause chronic sinusitis and/or fungal infections. This paper presents the case of a foreign body lodged in the right maxillary sinus ostium of a 31-year-old female patient. The foreign body was observed incidentally during radiological examination. After careful clinical and radiological examination, it was concluded that the foreign body was a piece of amalgam displaced into the maxillary sinus during a traumatic extraction. It is an uncommon finding to observe an asymptomatic dental foreign body in a position so close to the natural ostium of the maxillary sinus for so many years without any oro-antral fistula formation and/or sinusitis attacks. We describe the non-surgical approach to the case and the need for surgical management will be questioned. The importance of consultation between otolaryngologists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons will also be emphasised.