Global variation in skin injures and skincare practices in extremely preterm infants


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Jani P., Mishra U., Buchmayer J., Maheshwari R., D'Cruz D., Walker K., ...More

WORLD JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS, vol.19, no.2, pp.139-157, 2023 (SCI-Expanded) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 19 Issue: 2
  • Publication Date: 2023
  • Doi Number: 10.1007/s12519-022-00625-2
  • Journal Name: WORLD JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS
  • Journal Indexes: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED), Scopus, EMBASE, MEDLINE
  • Page Numbers: pp.139-157
  • Keywords: Extremely premature infants, Injuries, Neonatal intensive care unit, Skin care, Wounds, BIRTH-WEIGHT INFANTS, CHLORHEXIDINE GLUCONATE, LEPTOSPERMUM HONEY, PRESSURE ULCERS, POVIDONE-IODINE, INTENSIVE-CARE, WOUND CARE, WATER-LOSS, INTEGRITY, PREVENTION
  • Istanbul University Affiliated: No

Abstract

Background Globally, are skincare practices and skin injuries in extremely preterm infants comparable? This study describes skin injuries, variation in skincare practices and investigates any association between them. Methods A web-based survey was conducted between February 2019 and August 2021. Quantifying skin injuries and describing skincare practices in extremely preterm infants were the main outcomes. The association between skin injuries and skincare practices was established using binary multivariable logistic regression adjusted for regions. Results Responses from 848 neonatal intensive care units, representing all geographic regions and income status groups were received. Diaper dermatitis (331/840, 39%) and medical adhesive-related skin injuries (319/838, 38%) were the most common injuries. Following a local skincare guideline reduced skin injuries [medical adhesive-related injuries: adjusted odds ratios (aOR) = 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.45-0.88; perineal injuries: aOR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.45-0.96; local skin infections: OR = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.26-0.65; chemical burns: OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.26-0.83; thermal burns: OR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.27-0.96]. Performing skin assessments at least every four hours reduced skin injuries (abrasion: aOR = 0.48, 95% CI = 0.33-0.67; pressure: aOR = 0.51, 95% CI = 0.34-0.78; diaper dermatitis: aOR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.51-0.99; perineal: aOR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.36-0.75). Regional and resource settings-based variations in skin injuries and skincare practices were observed. Conclusions Skin injuries were common in extremely preterm infants. Consistency in practice and improved surveillance appears to reduce the occurrence of these injuries. Better evidence regarding optimal practices is needed to reduce skin injuries and minimize practice variations.