Optimization of Biopolymer Based Transdermal Films of Metoclopramide as an Alternative Delivery Approach


Aktar B., Erdal M. S. , Sagirli O. , Gungor S. , Ozsoy Y.

POLYMERS, vol.6, no.5, pp.1350-1365, 2014 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 6 Issue: 5
  • Publication Date: 2014
  • Doi Number: 10.3390/polym6051350
  • Title of Journal : POLYMERS
  • Page Numbers: pp.1350-1365

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to develop and to characterize sodium alginate based matrix-type transdermal films of metoclopramide hydrochloride (MTC) in order to improve patient compliance to treatment. The suitability of sodium alginate was shown to be a natural film former in terms of the physicochemical, mechanical, and bioadhesive features of the MTC loaded transdermal films. Terpinolene provided the highest drug release among the different terpenes (nerolidol, eucalyptol, dl-limonene, or terpinolene) assessed as enhancer. Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy analysis performed to evaluate the effect of the transdermal films on skin barrier confirmed enhancer induced lipid bilayer disruption in stratum corneum, indicating its permeation enhancement effect.

The objectives of this study were to develop and to characterize sodium alginate based matrix-type transdermal films of metoclopramide hydrochloride (MTC) in order to improve patient compliance to treatment. The suitability of sodium alginate was shown to be a natural film former in terms of the physicochemical, mechanical, and bioadhesive features of the MTC loaded transdermal films. Terpinolene provided the highest drug release among the different terpenes (nerolidol, eucalyptol, dl-limonene, or terpinolene) assessed as enhancer. Attenuated Total Reflectance Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy analysis performed to evaluate the effect of the transdermal films on skin barrier confirmed enhancer induced lipid bilayer disruption in stratum corneum, indicating its permeation enhancement effect.