Soft-tissue reconstruction of sole and heel defects with free tissue transfers


Yücel A., Şenyuva C., Aydin Y. , Çınar C. , Guzel Z.

ANNALS OF PLASTIC SURGERY, cilt.44, ss.259-268, 2000 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 44 Konu: 3
  • Basım Tarihi: 2000
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1097/00000637-200044030-00003
  • Dergi Adı: ANNALS OF PLASTIC SURGERY
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.259-268

Özet

Reconstruction of the weight-bearing surface of the foot is a challenging problem for the reconstructive surgeon. Because local tissues are not usually available for reconstruction, distant tissue transfers are often necessary. The authors report 20 patients with sole and heel defects that were reconstructed with free flaps. Two patients had bilateral reconstruction. Three patients were younger than 10 years. Etiological causes were burn scar (N = 7), trauma (N = 7), chronic wound (N = 3), and tumor resection (N = 5). All defects were located at a weight-bearing area. Gracilis muscle (N = 11), neurosensorial radial forearm (N = 7), latissimus dorsi muscle (N = 2), rectus abdominis muscle (N = 1), and posterolateral thigh flaps (N = 1) were used for reconstruction. Muscle flaps were preferred for the deep and irregular defects or chronic, open infected wounds. All flaps survived except for one total and two partial complications of necrosis. Recurrence of ulceration was observed in 1 patient with spinal cord trauma. The mean follow-up period was 33.7 months (range, 1-84 months). Patients were evaluated by direct gait observation, footprints, pedograms, and the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test. All patients returned to normal daily activity with individual gait patterns. Functional outcomes of both muscle and fasciocutaneous flaps were satisfactory. Presence of deep sensation, preservation of musculoskeletal integrity, and patient compliance are the main factors for durability of reconstruction.

Reconstruction of the weight-bearing surface of the foot is a challenging problem for the reconstructive surgeon. Because local tissues are not usually available for reconstruction, distant tissue transfers are often necessary. The authors report 20 patients with sole and heel defects that were reconstructed with free flaps. Two patients had bilateral reconstruction. Three patients were younger than 10 years. Etiological causes were burn scar (N = 7), trauma (N = 7), chronic wound (N = 3), and tumor resection (N = 5). All defects were located at a weight-bearing area. Gracilis muscle (N = 11), neurosensorial radial forearm (N = 7), latissimus dorsi muscle (N = 2), rectus abdominis muscle (N = 1), and posterolateral thigh flaps (N = 1) were used for reconstruction. Muscle flaps were preferred for the deep and irregular defects or chronic, open infected wounds. All flaps survived except for one total and two partial complications of necrosis. Recurrence of ulceration was observed in 1 patient with spinal cord trauma. The mean follow-up period was 33.7 months (range, 1-84 months). Patients were evaluated by direct gait observation, footprints, pedograms, and the Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test. All patients returned to normal daily activity with individual gait patterns. Functional outcomes of both muscle and fasciocutaneous flaps were satisfactory. Presence of deep sensation, preservation of musculoskeletal integrity, and patient compliance are the main factors for durability of reconstruction.