A BUILDING OF EXTRAORDINARY STYLE IN BUYUKADA: RECONSTRUCTION OF THE MIZZI MANSION BY RAIMONDO D'ARONCO


ADIGÜZEL H.

SANAT TARIHI DERGISI-JOURNAL OF ART HISTORY, vol.29, no.1, pp.1-31, 2020 (ESCI) identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 29 Issue: 1
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.29135/std.677857
  • Journal Name: SANAT TARIHI DERGISI-JOURNAL OF ART HISTORY
  • Journal Indexes: Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI), Directory of Open Access Journals, TR DİZİN (ULAKBİM)
  • Page Numbers: pp.1-31
  • Keywords: Buyukada, Residential Architecture, 19th Century Ottoman Architecture, Revivalism, Raimondo D'Aronco
  • Istanbul University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Mizzi Mansion, which adds a different taste to the Buyukada residential architecture, was presumably built in the mid-19th century. Significantly damaged during the 1894 Istanbul earthquake, the structure was repaired and reconstructed by Italian Architect Raimondo D'Aronco, who came to Istanbul in 1893. The project drawing has not survived, but the project, along with photographs, was exhibited at the Turin Art Triennial (Triennale d'Arte di Torino) in 1896. Italian architecture circles of the period praised the project. The Mizzi Mansion has not been researched as comprehensively as D'Aronco's other projects. The mansion is analyzed in this article in consideration of the original data accessed during the ongoing restoration process launched in 2000s and archive research. The new form of the Mizzi Mansion after D'Aronco's renovations features a revivalist style, which dominated Europe at the time. This article examines the stylistic identity of the mansion in the context of the origins of this approach, also traceable in the earlier works of the architect. The structure pioneered certain themes that became characteristic of the architect's later works, especially in facade formation and decorations. Within this framework, the project is also evaluated in regards to its position among the architect's other residential designs. The only drawing of this structure in the D'Aronco archive in Udine is an ironwork. The article introduces the Italian master, who does the ironwork of the building, along with his similar works in Torino. These findings open the door to unknown facts on the design and application team in contact with D'Aronco when he worked in Istanbul.