Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for Chronic Total Occlusion versus Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for Non-Complex Coronary Lesions: Is There a Different Impact on Thyroid Function?


Ureyen C. M. , Cosansu K. , Vural M. G. , Sahin S. E. , Cakar M. A. , Kilic H., ...More

MEDICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE, vol.29, pp.188-194, 2020 (Journal Indexed in SCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 29 Issue: 2
  • Publication Date: 2020
  • Doi Number: 10.1159/000503553
  • Title of Journal : MEDICAL PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE
  • Page Numbers: pp.188-194

Abstract

Objective: This study assessed whether high levels of iodide administered during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for chronic total occlusion (CTO) differentially influenced thyroid function compared to PCI for non-complex coronary lesions. Subjects and Methods: A total of 615 patients were enrolled in the study; 205 underwent elective PCI for CTO lesions (Group I) and 410 underwent elective PCI for non-complex lesions including non-CTO, non-bifurcation, non-calcified, and non-tortuous lesions (Group II). Patients were monitored for development of incidental thyroid dysfunction between 1 and 6 months after PCI. Results: The patients in Group I were administered a median of 255 mL of contrast medium during PCI for CTO; a median of 80 mL was administered to the patients in Group II during non-complex PCI (p =0.001). Ten (5.4%) of the 186 euthyroid patients in Group I and 19 (5%) of the 379 eu-thyroid patients in Group II developed subclinical hyper-thyroidism (p = 0.854). However, 7 (50%) of the 14 subclinical hyperthyroid patients in Group I and only 3 (12%) of the 25 subclinical hyperthyroid patients in Group II developed overt hyperthyroidism (p = 0.019). Conclusion: In euthyroid patients, PCI for coronary CTO lesions did not increase the risk for subclinical hyperthyroidism when compared to PCI for non-complex coronary lesions. However, in patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism at baseline, PCI for coronary CTO lesions significantly increased the development of overt hyperthyroidism when compared to PCI for non-complex coronary lesions.